Friday, July 4, 2014

New Project: On the Docket. Weekend to-do list videos posted bi-weekly

I’m barely tumblring anymore (find me on instagram, mostly, or Twitter, sometimes), but I’m still doing a few things. More information here.

Friday, October 18, 2013
It’s always fun to see a little bit of sexism in local advertising. And by “fun” and mean “overall gross and disappointing.” This is an ad I saw in the skyway today for the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management, aka the ritzy place where you can get an MBA.
Since the early 1980s, “glass ceiling” is a term used to describe employment discrimination against women and minorities, the idea that you can see people at the top but sexism and racism continually prevent you from being promoted.
You can see from the graph in the Wikipedia entry on Glass Ceiling, that this discrimination has nothing to do with education.
This ad posits that if more women get a degree in business, then there won’t be any more glass ceiling. Easy solution, ladies! Get your MBA and then you’ll be just as qualified as every man in a top position! There’s no actual discrimination, you just don’t have enough degrees from prominent business schools!
This whole idea is, of course, bullshit. Systematic discrimination exists, and it’s not because women aren’t trying hard enough to get advanced degrees. (In fact, more women than ever are getting MBAs. Whether it’s worth it is another issue.) It’s a classic instance of blaming sexism on individual accomplishments rather than a cultural prejudice for which there is pretty solid scientific proof, to say nothing of anecdotal evidence.
Why this ad is especially disappointing: it’s an ad for the University of Minnesota, my alma mater. It’s where I got my master’s degree in Mass Communication— where my skills in recognizing stupid sexist advertising were finely honed. I’d venture a guess that at least one of the agency folks who created this ad went to the U of M, and it’s sad to note that no one in Carlson’s communications department thought that “maybe this isn’t a good way to get more women to apply to our school.”
I would like to see this ad taken down because it takes a useful term for describing the concept of systematic discrimination and uses it to blame women for not being good enough at their careers, for not having enough accomplishments, and for generally being less than. It’s fucking bullshit sexism, and there’s no excuse.

It’s always fun to see a little bit of sexism in local advertising. And by “fun” and mean “overall gross and disappointing.” This is an ad I saw in the skyway today for the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management, aka the ritzy place where you can get an MBA.

Since the early 1980s, “glass ceiling” is a term used to describe employment discrimination against women and minorities, the idea that you can see people at the top but sexism and racism continually prevent you from being promoted.

You can see from the graph in the Wikipedia entry on Glass Ceiling, that this discrimination has nothing to do with education.

This ad posits that if more women get a degree in business, then there won’t be any more glass ceiling. Easy solution, ladies! Get your MBA and then you’ll be just as qualified as every man in a top position! There’s no actual discrimination, you just don’t have enough degrees from prominent business schools!

This whole idea is, of course, bullshit. Systematic discrimination exists, and it’s not because women aren’t trying hard enough to get advanced degrees. (In fact, more women than ever are getting MBAs. Whether it’s worth it is another issue.) It’s a classic instance of blaming sexism on individual accomplishments rather than a cultural prejudice for which there is pretty solid scientific proof, to say nothing of anecdotal evidence.

Why this ad is especially disappointing: it’s an ad for the University of Minnesota, my alma mater. It’s where I got my master’s degree in Mass Communication— where my skills in recognizing stupid sexist advertising were finely honed. I’d venture a guess that at least one of the agency folks who created this ad went to the U of M, and it’s sad to note that no one in Carlson’s communications department thought that “maybe this isn’t a good way to get more women to apply to our school.”

I would like to see this ad taken down because it takes a useful term for describing the concept of systematic discrimination and uses it to blame women for not being good enough at their careers, for not having enough accomplishments, and for generally being less than. It’s fucking bullshit sexism, and there’s no excuse.

Friday, July 26, 2013
Regrets: Last night I missed Spoutstock, one of my favorite Twin Cities annual arts events. In the basement of Gasthof’s, a bunch of local literary Gen Xers and their kin gather and have a cover song contest. I went a couple of years ago and it was a bundle of fun. Like, all those media people who think that the local literary scene just got revitalized are totally wrong; Spout Press has been publishing locally and awesomely for two decades. They throw a hella cool annual event. Best local indie print pub, easily.
To atone: I will recommend two more upcoming local arts events that you should probably go to. You will find the next big thing(s).
1. Red Hot Art is this weekend in Stevens Square. Almost every year I run through this event because it is either raining or blistering hot, but this weekend the weather’s going to be idyllic. You should go— check out local emerging artists and affordable artwork. Spend some time there (instead of next weekend’s stupid Uptown Art Fair) and find the next big thing.
More info.
2. Autoptic is on August 18. It’s a one-day festival of comic art, posters, music and other things! At the lovely Aria, this event has everything: prison food, ablatio penises, dumb dirty eyes, paintings of bigfoot and Sammy the mouse. (Seriously: really great collection of indie cartoonists and other artists, with a nice nice nice helping of great women who draw— Lilli Carré, Lisa Hanawalt, Domitille Collardey and a ton of other women artists with whom I’m unfamiliar, and they’re all clearly the next big thing.) Also: Aesthetic Apparatus, Landland and other amazing posters. Yes, Will is exhibiting, but I would go regardless. Art fun!
More info.
Go! Enjoy!

Regrets: Last night I missed Spoutstock, one of my favorite Twin Cities annual arts events. In the basement of Gasthof’s, a bunch of local literary Gen Xers and their kin gather and have a cover song contest. I went a couple of years ago and it was a bundle of fun. Like, all those media people who think that the local literary scene just got revitalized are totally wrong; Spout Press has been publishing locally and awesomely for two decades. They throw a hella cool annual event. Best local indie print pub, easily.

To atone: I will recommend two more upcoming local arts events that you should probably go to. You will find the next big thing(s).

1. Red Hot Art is this weekend in Stevens Square. Almost every year I run through this event because it is either raining or blistering hot, but this weekend the weather’s going to be idyllic. You should go— check out local emerging artists and affordable artwork. Spend some time there (instead of next weekend’s stupid Uptown Art Fair) and find the next big thing.

More info.

2. Autoptic is on August 18. It’s a one-day festival of comic art, posters, music and other things! At the lovely Aria, this event has everything: prison food, ablatio penises, dumb dirty eyes, paintings of bigfoot and Sammy the mouse. (Seriously: really great collection of indie cartoonists and other artists, with a nice nice nice helping of great women who draw— Lilli Carré, Lisa Hanawalt, Domitille Collardey and a ton of other women artists with whom I’m unfamiliar, and they’re all clearly the next big thing.) Also: Aesthetic Apparatus, Landland and other amazing posters. Yes, Will is exhibiting, but I would go regardless. Art fun!

More info.

Go! Enjoy!

Friday, April 5, 2013
Gosling on a Motorcycle at the Uptown. Hey girl, wanna get some designer shoes and eat at the new Origami before we realize that my platinum hairdo in this movie really is a non-punk salon shade of honey blond?

Gosling on a Motorcycle at the Uptown. Hey girl, wanna get some designer shoes and eat at the new Origami before we realize that my platinum hairdo in this movie really is a non-punk salon shade of honey blond?

Saturday, December 22, 2012
But I really don’t think kids should be driving, especially if their spelling is that atrocious!

But I really don’t think kids should be driving, especially if their spelling is that atrocious!

Sunday, December 16, 2012
Tonight I was stopped while a train passed for ten minutes. Most of the train passed in front of me slowly, and then most of the train went in reverse, slowly, and then the train stopped, and then the train passed in front of me again, quickly, until finally the railroad crossing was lifted.
On the train was lumber, it seemed, one of the many parts of the production process that I know nothing about. This train can waste ten minutes of my day, just like some contrived website with production processes I know everything about. I am more fundamentally curious about the train than the website, but still I know nothing about the U.S. commercial rail system and I spend time, every day, on websites I don’t care about. You might say that when I spend time on those websites, that I’m derailing.
My old house, about a mile farther north from my apartment now, was right next to the train yard. The apartment would often shake or I’d be awakened by booms and train horns. I don’t know what kinds of products when into that train yard. What kinds of hobos went into that train yard. I have said that I love the trains in my neighborhood because they make me feel connected. I do not know what is on the trains but they make me feel connected. Unlike the commuter rail lines out east, these trains move slowly and darkly, over bridges and through neighborhoods. They are part of the landscape but not a part of life. And I say they make me feel connected.
On my commute home every day, I drive over a set of train tracks that has no railroad crossing signs. There is only a stop sign, and you can’t really see what’s on the tracks until you are almost through the stop sign. Sometimes trains go over this track and I have to stop while they cross in front of me, with nothing but a stop sign and some negative space between me and the train. How are there train crossings without warning signs and barriers? How could this happen?
The weekend was bookended by parties, one of which I threw, and it was lovely. But it was a hard weekend. You know. It was the kind of hard weekend I barely talked about with anyone. I do not think that I want to talk. I don’t even know if I want to know more about the trains, but here is the train that I saw.

Tonight I was stopped while a train passed for ten minutes. Most of the train passed in front of me slowly, and then most of the train went in reverse, slowly, and then the train stopped, and then the train passed in front of me again, quickly, until finally the railroad crossing was lifted.

On the train was lumber, it seemed, one of the many parts of the production process that I know nothing about. This train can waste ten minutes of my day, just like some contrived website with production processes I know everything about. I am more fundamentally curious about the train than the website, but still I know nothing about the U.S. commercial rail system and I spend time, every day, on websites I don’t care about. You might say that when I spend time on those websites, that I’m derailing.

My old house, about a mile farther north from my apartment now, was right next to the train yard. The apartment would often shake or I’d be awakened by booms and train horns. I don’t know what kinds of products when into that train yard. What kinds of hobos went into that train yard. I have said that I love the trains in my neighborhood because they make me feel connected. I do not know what is on the trains but they make me feel connected. Unlike the commuter rail lines out east, these trains move slowly and darkly, over bridges and through neighborhoods. They are part of the landscape but not a part of life. And I say they make me feel connected.

On my commute home every day, I drive over a set of train tracks that has no railroad crossing signs. There is only a stop sign, and you can’t really see what’s on the tracks until you are almost through the stop sign. Sometimes trains go over this track and I have to stop while they cross in front of me, with nothing but a stop sign and some negative space between me and the train. How are there train crossings without warning signs and barriers? How could this happen?

The weekend was bookended by parties, one of which I threw, and it was lovely. But it was a hard weekend. You know. It was the kind of hard weekend I barely talked about with anyone. I do not think that I want to talk. I don’t even know if I want to know more about the trains, but here is the train that I saw.

Sunday, December 9, 2012 Sunday, December 2, 2012 Tuesday, October 9, 2012

But first the Hooters went, then the arcade. Eventually the Applebee’s and the Hard Rock and the burrito vendor and the Cold Stone and the Mrs. Fields all departed, leaving the AMC theater to singlehandedly represent the indoor shopping center with its red decor, long ago chosen by brand specialists to mimic Hollywood glamour.The fanfare at Hennepin and Lagoon began as Ira Glass and Mike Birbiglia entered to premier the latter’s new film. Exclusive tickets were sold only to MPR members. They entered to the 2012 definition of movie theater glamour: a single screen with a digital projector, ample legroom, pre-assigned seating, restored art deco-era murals, and a beer-and-wine license. A far cry from its semi-dingy predecessor, the Uptown’s insides had been gutted, and a theater that in 2011 could hold more than 800 cinephiles had been reduced in a matter of months to 357 plush leather armchairs with very nice cupholders. Its grand marquee remained, the potential canvas for smartass underpaid employees to Hennepin Avenue, but three films into its run, there have been no jokes, not about The Master or Perks of Being a Wallflower— both of which are such easy targets.

In the first Successes and Failures essay, I am writing about movie theaters in Minneapolis. It will be ready this weekend or soon thereafter. Do you want to read it? Join here.
EDIT: I did not take this photo and spent all night feeling guilty that I hadn’t credited it. It is from here. Sorry, photographer.

But first the Hooters went, then the arcade. Eventually the Applebee’s and the Hard Rock and the burrito vendor and the Cold Stone and the Mrs. Fields all departed, leaving the AMC theater to singlehandedly represent the indoor shopping center with its red decor, long ago chosen by brand specialists to mimic Hollywood glamour.

The fanfare at Hennepin and Lagoon began as Ira Glass and Mike Birbiglia entered to premier the latter’s new film. Exclusive tickets were sold only to MPR members. They entered to the 2012 definition of movie theater glamour: a single screen with a digital projector, ample legroom, pre-assigned seating, restored art deco-era murals, and a beer-and-wine license. A far cry from its semi-dingy predecessor, the Uptown’s insides had been gutted, and a theater that in 2011 could hold more than 800 cinephiles had been reduced in a matter of months to 357 plush leather armchairs with very nice cupholders. Its grand marquee remained, the potential canvas for smartass underpaid employees to Hennepin Avenue, but three films into its run, there have been no jokes, not about The Master or Perks of Being a Wallflower— both of which are such easy targets.

In the first Successes and Failures essay, I am writing about movie theaters in Minneapolis. It will be ready this weekend or soon thereafter. Do you want to read it? Join here.

EDIT: I did not take this photo and spent all night feeling guilty that I hadn’t credited it. It is from here. Sorry, photographer.

Thursday, October 4, 2012
jamiatt:

Minneapolis.

Can I just walk in to the Heartland Fall Forum and see Jami Attenberg? I work in publishing, sort of.

jamiatt:

Minneapolis.

Can I just walk in to the Heartland Fall Forum and see Jami Attenberg? I work in publishing, sort of.